HEALTH

Enhancing local healthcare capacities

The EU is strongly committed to global health and health security and is a driving force behind efforts to prevent, respond to and mitigate the effects of major health crises. New paradigms associated with globalisation, increasing prosperity and rapid environmental change mean that the world must learn to live with the potential worldwide impact of local crises.

Recent events, such as the coronavirus pandemic, have demonstrated that pandemic readiness and response remain huge challenges, globally, regionally and nationally. “Team Europe” has put together a comprehensive package to support Indonesia’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The EU is strongly committed to global health and health security and is a driving force behind efforts to prevent, respond to and mitigate the effects of major health crises. New paradigms associated with globalisation, increasing prosperity and rapid environmental change mean that the world must learn to live with the potential worldwide impact of local crises.

Recent events, such as the coronavirus pandemic, have demonstrated that pandemic readiness and response remain huge challenges, globally, regionally and nationally. “Team Europe” has put together a comprehensive package to support Indonesia’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Indonesia has made steady progress in increasing the health and life expectancy of its population but still faces challenges in assuring the health of all its citizens, especially the poorest. In some regions, infant and child mortality rates remain high, and malnutrition severely impairs the growth of over one in three of those under five years old. With over 500,000 new or relapsed cases of tuberculosis (TB) each year, including a rising number of multi-drug resistant cases, and around 75,000 annual TB deaths, along with over 500,000 people living with HIV/AIDS, communicable diseases remain a problem. Diseases such as malaria and dengue persist, and increasing prosperity means that the burdens of chronic conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders are rising.

Healthcare initiatives funded by the EU and its Member States support Indonesia on the control and eradication of tropical and infectious diseases, provide capacity building support to local and community-level healthcare services, contribute to efforts to reduce chronic malnutrition and stunting among children through education and training, and to improve maternal, infant and child health.

Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Indonesia

In August 2019 at the G7 Summit in Biarritz in France, the EU announced its commitment to provide an additional €550 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM). This represents an increase of 16 percent over the EU’s previous contribution and signals Europe’s commitment to ending the three diseases by 2030. It also illustrates the EU’s determination to lead in global health and ensure that all relevant experience is applied to the coronavirus response.

The GFATM is a non-profit foundation established to build partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society to support patients affected by these diseases. With more than 1,000 programmes in over 150 countries, the Global Fund has provided prevention, treatment and care services to hundreds of millions of people, helped strengthen local health systems and revitalise communities, and saved millions of lives.

Team Europe supports the GFATM